Exhibition

Takako Azami's Solo exhibition
Transformation
2650 x 206mm
sumi ink, pigments, resinous glue, hemp paper

  • 浅見貴子 - 未然の決断

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Takako Azami's Solo exhibition

2021, Nov. 12(Fri.) - Dec, 5 (Sun.) scheduled

Art Front Gallery is pleased to announce solo exhibition of Takako Azami.
Date 2021, Nov. 12(Fri.) - Dec, 5 (Sun.) scheduled
Hours Wed. - Fri. 12:00 - 19:00 / Sat. Sun. 11:00 - 17:00 *shortening in opening hours
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays
Takako Azami — From Expression to Creation
                               
I first encountered the work of Takako Azami in 2010, when I invited her to ARKO (Artist-in-Residence, Ohara) at the Ohara Museum of Arts, a programme we had set up to support emerging artists. She established her studio in a villa outside Kurashiki called Muison-so, which had once been the residence of Torajiro Kojima, a Western-style painter from the turn of the 19th century. She initially concentrated on sketching the garden’s pine trees, to grasp their forms and positions, as well as the feel of the surrounding space. She then began to render this in ink dots and lines of different shades and sizes, applied from the reverse of the paper. The results were stunning. From what were overtly just traces of ink, emerged the definite presence of trees, in their spatial atmosphere of light and air.

Ten years later, I was struck again by Azami’s work when I saw it in Process of Transformation, an exhibition at the Nakamuraya Salon Museum of Art, Tokyo. Displayed were the works she had created at the Muison-so, together with Gray Net, which depicted scenery seen through the fly-screen windows of her studio. Such screens do not so much obscure the outside, as divide space into a psychological this-side and other-side. In order to erode this division, Azami included the lattice pattern in the picture plane. Instead of depicting the space outside, she created a pictorial zone which is continuous, without rupture. Takako Azami became the creator of new space.
                          
Shuji Takashina, Director, Ohara Museum of Art

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